Escape Virtuality – Ghost Collector [Review]

The many ghosts of Professor Pepper.

Location:  New York, NY

Date Played: October 29, 2019

Team size: 2-8; we recommend 2-4

Duration: 60 minutes

Price:  Starting at $39 per player

Ticketing: Public

Emergency Exit Rating: [A+] No Lock

Physical Restraints: [A+] No Physical Restraints

REA Reaction

Escape Virtuality opened in Manhattan earlier this year with a large, street-level storefront, offering a mix or virtual reality experiences and real life escape games.

Ghost Collector was a (real life) escape room with a solid set, interactive solves, and illusions. The opens were largely tech-driven, which worked well with the theme.

In-game: Closeup of a twistable Ouiji board with a bookcase in the background.

The puzzles lacked balance: either too easy, or challenging for the wrong reasons, and without appropriate feedback… and most of them felt more like tasks than puzzles.

The overall experience will likely impress newer players even if they struggle with the gameplay. For more experienced players, this is the type of escape room that some will solve too quickly and others will be haunted for most of the game by a single stumper. If you’re looking for your escape room fix in Manhattan, there certainly are some things to love in Ghost Collector… and it has a lot of unrealized potential.

It’s clear that the owners have put a lot of love into this business and we believe that they could do great things in our home market.

Who is this for?

  • Adventure seekers
  • Aspiring Ghostbusters
  • Any experience level
  • Players who don’t need to be a part of every puzzle

Why play?

  • A strong opening and closing
  • Some fun effects
  • One very elegant, clever puzzle

Story

A mysterious man had spent his life capturing the malevolent ghosts haunting New York City.

We had been given the opportunity to enter his containment chamber and view the entities. However, viewing them would set them free if we couldn’t complete a ritual to re-bind them within their eternal prison.

In-game: A wall with a glowing set of symbols set in a circle.

Setting

Ghost Collector’s set was fairly well designed, if a little uneven.

The big set pieces generally looked and felt good, especially in the opening and closing sequences.

The rest of the set wasn’t necessarily fantastic, but was painted and decorated so as to be innocuous. Honestly, that made it better than most sets. I thought it was a clever approach.

In-game: A Ouiji board-like device on a seance table.

Gameplay

Escape Virtuality’s Ghost Collector was a standard escape room with a moderate level of difficulty.

Core gameplay revolved around searching, following instructions, and puzzling.

In-game: A stacked, twistable Ouiji board.

Analysis

➕ The ghost collecting theme worked with Escape Virtuality’s style. Given the context of the game, we could interpret the technologically-triggered opens as magical or haunted. The gating style meshed well with the ghosty illusions.

➕ The set looked pretty good and felt solid. We especially enjoyed one large, interactive set piece.

➖ As much as we enjoyed the main set piece, the interactions were entirely task based, and felt a bit neutered (one puzzle notwithstanding). This prop delivered the main events of the experience. There was an opportunity to do more with it.

➖ In many of the puzzles, Escape Virtuality struggled to balance difficulty. The puzzle were either straightforward tasks or challenging for the wrong reasons. A lack of feedback for certain solves magnified this imbalance.

➕ We loved the aha moment when we got a handle on one puzzle’s originally overlooked complexity. We loved this puzzle and wish that Escape Virtuality played more with concepts along these lines.

➖ Ghost Collector included a runbook. While we appreciated that we could separate the pages of the spiral-bound diary and rely on it for multiple puzzles at once, we wished that the cluing had been integrated into the world of the game instead.

➖ /➕ Ghost Collector was haunted by a soundtrack. While we appreciated the ambiance, we found it to be discordant with some of the room design.

Ghost Collector is expensive. This pricing is in line with some other local escape rooms. After all, Entertainment in Manhattan is expensive. That said, Ghost Collector didn’t offer a ton of gameplay for that price. Experienced players could solve it quite quickly. Booking Ghost Collector is a value judgement.

Tips For Visiting

  • Parking is a challenge in Manhattan. Take the subway (1 to 28th Street or the R/W to 28th Street.)
  • There are tons of restaurants in this neighborhood. We enjoy Hill Country Barbecue and Market.

Book your hour with Escape Virtuality’s Ghost Collector, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Disclosure: Escape Virtuality provided media discounted tickets for this game.

Mission Escapes – Treasure Hunt [Review]

It was better than it looked.

Location:  Aurora, CO

Date Played: September 7, 2019

Team size: 2-8; we recommend 3-4

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: from $76 per team for teams of 2 to $184 per team for teams of 8

Ticketing: Private

Emergency Exit Rating: [A+] No Lock

Physical Restraints: [A+] No Physical Restraints

REA Reaction

Stepping into Treasure Hunt felt like entering a time warp to the early days of escape rooms. The first act looked and played aggressively old-school.

In-game: An old and worn office setting with mang pictures hung on the walls.

As the second act unfolded, Mission Escapes presented something more dramatic and interesting.

Overall, Treasure Hunt was a standard, traditional escape room that played smoothly and had a couple of interesting moments. It was a solid game because it played well… and that’s still something. If you’re in the area and want to explore something a bit old-school, check out Treasure Hunt. That said, Lunar Mission was a considerably more intriguing game.

Who is this for?

  • Puzzle lovers
  • Any experience level
  • Newbies

Why play?

  • Solid yet traditional escape room gameplay
  • A strong reveal
  • A few novel puzzles
  • The treasure was well-chosen

Story

The office of a deceased wealthy man seemed to contain a wide variety of puzzles hiding his most treasured item. His heirs couldn’t solve them, so we were brought in to figure out what was going on.

In-game: a cabinent locked with 6 differend padlocks.

Setting

At first glance, Treasure Hunt looked like escape rooms did in 2015. It was an office filled with used furniture and padlocks.

The second act put a different twist on this experience. In a lot of ways, it felt like Lunar Escape, Mission Escapes’ other game. This shorter segment was where Treasure Hunt shined and justified its existence.

In-game: A long wooden cabinet covered in black and white blocks of wood.

Gameplay

Mission Escapes’ Treasure Hunt was a standard escape room with a low level of difficulty.

Core gameplay revolved around searching, making connections, and puzzling.

Analysis

➕/➖ Treasure Hunt felt like the type of escape room that got us hooked on these things back in 2014/15. That also meant that it felt dated in many places.

➖ The first set didn’t look like much. It didn’t instill any energy or a sense of adventure.

➕ The puzzles flowed well from start to finish. They were well-clued and resolved cleanly.

➕ Although the set and props were basic, Mission Escapes added some details, like using cloth instead of paper to deliver written clues.

➖ We encountered wear on a later puzzle that caused issues in both the cluing and the triggering of an otherwise solid puzzle.

➕ The second act felt so unlike the first. This was surprising and intriguing. Treasure Hunt shined most in this segment.

➖ Although the transition space looked neat, the construction was messy. Players will move through this space in the dark. It needed better padding and the ceiling height shouldn’t change; it was too easy to hit one’s head too hard. I know because I bashed my head pretty badly.

➕/➖ We liked how Mission Escapes added pressure to the final moments, whether or not a team had been racing the game clock. That said, the “puzzle” felt cheap and its resolution even less satisfying. This was a case of a great concept, but rough execution… although I imagine it might feel different to a newbie.

Tips For Visiting

  • There is a parking lot.
  • Mission Escape is on the third floor, Suite 390.
  • Players need to be able to crawl to play this game.

Book your hour with Mission Escapes’ Treasure Hunt, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Disclosure: Mission Escapes comped our tickets for this game.

Disclosure: Our trip to Denver was sponsored by the Denver escape room community. Contributions were anonymous.

Stream "Create The Escape" Today!

I finally got to watch Escape From Goopiter, the pilot episode of Create The Escape that I worked on. I’m so happy with how it came out. It’s adorable.

I feel really good about how it represents escape rooms.

Escape From Goopitor logo has planets and tenticles.

There are more details about this in my post from the other day, but the most important thing to know is that you can stream it from Universal Kids.

Please do watch it and share it far and wide.

A spaceship interior with windows peering out at a planet's surface.

The Puzzle Effect – Curse on the Emerald Seas [Review]

“It’s just a flesh wound.”

Location:  Northglenn, CO

Date Played: September 8, 2019

Team size: up to 6; we recommend 4-6

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: $29 per player

Ticketing: Private

Emergency Exit Rating: [A+] No Lock

Physical Restraints: [A+] No Physical Restraints

REA Reaction

Curse on the Emerald Seas was a particularly difficult, yet fair escape game… and we don’t make that statement lightly. Every single puzzle was clued well and resolved cleanly, but, oh boy, did The Puzzle Effect make us work for the win.

The game itself looked good. Elegant set embellishments really sold the space.

In-game:

If you aren’t a strong puzzler, winning this game without a heap of hints will be a tall order. Respect Curse on the Emerald Seas, matey, and play it if you know the ropes.

For those who know their way around escape rooms, there were some exhilarating solves in this one.

Who is this for?

  • Puzzle lovers
  • Cursed pirates – arrrrgh
  • Players with at least some experience

Why play?

  • Brilliant and dastardly puzzles
  • Some beautiful and well-used set pieces

Story

After enduring a storm, our crew had discovered the legendary pirate ship the Emerald Seas. The story went that the ship’s crew had cursed themselves by trading their captain’s heart for treasure. Locals told of the ship rising from the depths for one hour every 20 years. That was all the time that we had to break the curse and seize the treasure for ourselves.

In-game:

Setting

Curse on the Emerald Seas was staged within a pirate ship. From floor to ceiling, the game was paneled in weathered wood. It generally looked sharp.

The puzzles stood out as looking especially escape room-y, but that didn’t take away from the experience.

In-game:

Gameplay

The Puzzle Effect’s Curse on the Emerald Seas was a standard escape room with a high level of difficulty.

Core gameplay revolved around searching, observing, making connections, and puzzling.

In-game:

Analysis

➕ Curse on the Emerald Seas looked pirate ship-y. It wasn’t all wooden planks either. The back deck looked out into the bright night.

➕ The gameplay flowed well from one puzzle to the next, one open to the next.

➕ Curse on the Emerald Seas was a challenging escape room with some complex, layered puzzles. These were well-clued, and especially satisfying solves with multiple “aha” moments.

➖ While some of the cluing was integrated into the world, much of it was on laminated pieces of paper.

➖ Curse on the Emerald Seas needed better lighting for one complex puzzle with small visual cluing.

➕ The difficulty curve worked well. Curse on the Emerald Seas built up to the challenging puzzles. Then we rode that wave back down to the game’s conclusion.

Tips For Visiting

  • There is a parking lot.
  • The Puzzle Effect offers this game in other cities as well, including San Luis Obispo and Phoenix.

Book your hour with The Puzzle Effect’s Curse on the Emerald Seas, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Disclosure: The Puzzle Effect comped our tickets for this game.

Disclosure: Our trip to Denver was sponsored by the Denver escape room community. Contributions were anonymous.

St. Louis, Missouri: Escape Room Recommendations

Latest update: November 30, 2019

I’m not going to lie. St. Louis isn’t an escape room destination. There are pretty games and there are fun games… but we couldn’t find anything that was the total package.

However, what you will find in St. Louis is the City Museum, a gem of another kind.

Stylized image of the Arch in St. Louis.

Market Standouts

City Museum is not an escape room, but it is absolutely the market standout. Wear knee pads.

Set & Scenery Driven

Puzzle Centric

Newbie Friendly

Spooky & Scary

Something Else

City Museum is not an escape room. However, it was finest immersive experience that we encountered in St. Louis. We highly recommend this adventure playground for all ages.

Puzzle Warehouse is also not an escape room, but if you happen to also be a jigsaw puzzle fan, it’s a place worth checking out. It claims to be the largest jigsaw puzzle store in the United States, and we believe it.

You are always welcome to contact us if this recommendation list doesn’t answer your specific questions.

Puzzle Warehouse – St. Louis [Reaction]

St Louis isn’t exactly the hottest escape room city. However, if you’re a traveling puzzler there is a delightful place just outside of town: Puzzle Warehouse.

Puzzle Warehouse exterior and sign.

What’s a Puzzle Warehouse?

The Puzzle Warehouse claims that it is the largest jigsaw puzzle store in the United States… and I am inclined to believe them.

They have aisles upon aisles of jigsaw puzzles as well as a respectable mechanical puzzle section.

A very long aisle filled with jigsaw puzzle boxes.

Should I Visit Puzzle Warehouse?

Not every escape room player is into jigsaw puzzles.

If you don’t get the appeal of a good jigsaw puzzle, then you can skip Puzzle Warehouse.

If you heard “aisles upon aisles of jigsaw puzzles” and thought, “I’ll pack an empty suitcase,” then you probably should go.

Shopping carts in the Puzzle Warehouse
They have shopping carts. Process that.

Visit Puzzle Warehouse, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Rabbit Hole Recreation Services – Paradox [Review]

Lightning Ride

Location:  Louisville, CO

Date Played: September 8, 2019

Team size: 2-8; we recommend 5-6

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: 2 players – $40 per person; 3 players – $35 per person; 4 players & up – $30 per person

Ticketing: Private

Emergency Exit Rating: [A+] No Lock

Physical Restraints: [A+] No Physical Restraints

REA Reaction

Paradox was another fantastic escape room from Rabbit Hole Recreation Services. Set in a steam-punkish time machine with Tardis overtones, Paradox was puzzley in the best kind of way.

In-game:

Each challenge came with a new interface and tools and asked us to think in a different way. The puzzles were tangible. Solving each felt like an accomplishment.

From a set and tech standpoint, Paradox was about as on-point as Mystic Temple. Rabbit Hole Recreation Services knows how to build an energetic and engaging escape game.

If you’re choosing between Paradox and Mystic Temple, I think that most will prefer Mystic Temple… if only for the ending. If you’re more into puzzle-driven gameplay, I’d go with Paradox. That said, if you’re already visiting, dive all the way down the Rabbit Hole and play both.

Who is this for?

  • Adventure seekers
  • Puzzle lovers
  • Scenery snobs
  • Sci-fi fans
  • Dr WHO fans
  • Players with at least some experience
  • Players who don’t need to be a part of every puzzle

Why play?

  • A large volume of fun and engaging puzzles
  • The set had some fantastic interactions
  • It was a strong all around experience

Story

As a powerful electrical storm passed over the lab, we had to complete the construction of our time machine and harness the power of lightning to traverse space and time.

In-game:

Setting

Paradox opened in an elegant study that seemed influenced by the video game series The Room. There was a massive device hooked up to barrels by large wires. That device was an appetizer teasing the contraptions that lay ahead.

As with Mystic Temple, the game was loaded with embedded technology. In this escape room, however, the tech was a bit louder as it was supposed to function as a steampunk-ish Tardis.

In-game:

Gameplay

Rabbit Hole Recreation Services’ Paradox was a standard escape room with an higher level of difficulty.

Core gameplay revolved around searching, observing, making connections, and puzzling.

In-game:

Analysis

➕ Paradox was beautiful. From the opening moments, the set was elegantly designed, intricate, and interactive. Later on, it was breathtaking. We loved exploring the world of Paradox.

➕ Rabbit Hole Recreation Services used effects brilliantly. They felt connected to our interactions and they belonged in the world of the game. They brightened the playthrough.

In-game:

➕ Rabbit Hole Recreation Services minded the details, not just visually, but in every sense of their interaction design. One prop was especially cool to touch.

➖ Given the ingenuity that went into every inch of this set, there was one set piece that we really wanted more from – partially because we loved it – and also because it just didn’t seem to have a significance that matched its coolness.

➕ We’d never seen a radio interaction quite like this one. The puzzle concept worked beautifully. 

Paradox included an unusual reflection of a standard puzzle concept that we especially enjoyed.

➕ The gameplay branched well. We gravitated toward certain puzzles with an understanding of how they would fit together in the end. We reunited for the finale.

➖ In the late-game, we followed written instructions on a sheet of paper. The clarity was appreciated, but that single sheet felt out of place in this world. There was an opportunity to build native cluing.

➕ There were a lot of challenging puzzles in Paradox. They were difficult in different ways and required different skills to solve. We enjoyed the variety.

Tips For Visiting

  • There is a parking lot.
  • This game contains flashing lights and strobes.

Book your hour with Rabbit Hole Recreation Services’ Paradox, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Disclosure: Rabbit Hole Recreation Services comped our tickets for this game.

Disclosure: Our trip to Denver was sponsored by the Denver escape room community. Contributions were anonymous.

Watch the “Create The Escape” Pilot Episode

[Updated December 2, 2019: a direct link to the streaming site]

I have secret projects on top of secret projects on top of secret projects.

A few months ago I did a little work on the Create The Escape pilot episode. Create The Escape is a show where kids create an escape room for their parents to play.

The target audience is kids… and you should watch it with your family this weekend!

Escape From Goopitor logo has planets and tenticles.
The kids named the game.

When Can I Watch?

The episode airs this Sunday, December 1 at 5pm and 9pm on Universal Kids.

There are also streaming options at universalkids.com.

The episode is labeled on TV as an extra episode of the series Get Out Of My Room.

A spaceship interior with windows peering out at a planet's surface.

What’s Your Involvement?

You’re not going to see me on TV again.

Hillary Manning, former manager of both Escape The Room NYC and Beat The Bomb, appeared on camera. I worked behind the scenes with Juliana Patel & Ariel Rubin of The Wild Optimists along with many other talented people.

There are lots of stories to tell, but now is not the time. All I’ll say is that I’m proud of how things shaped up… and December 1st will be the first time I see the episode.

It was an honor being involved. I hope that we’ve done the escape room world proud.

The Official SAW Escape [Review]

I played a game.

Location:  Las Vegas, NV

Date Played: October 24, 2019

Team size: up to 10; we recommend 5 (both for practical reasons and so you can call yourselves the Fatal Five)

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: $49.99 per player for a public ticket; private VIP tickets available at other prices

Ticketing: Public, with private VIP ticketing available

Emergency Exit Rating: [A+] No Lock

Physical Restraints: [A+] No Physical Restraints

REA Reaction

When I started playing room escapes nearly six years ago, non-players would ask “Oh, like the SAW movies?” (uh, no). To finally play an escape room that actually was inspired by SAW was surreal.

The Official SAW Escape Las Vegas logo depicting Jigsaw.
Image via Official SAW Escape

The Official SAW Escape bills itself as an immersive experience that “brings to life twisted games inspired by the blockbuster SAW film franchise.” It seriously delivered. Stepping inside felt like crossing over into Jigsaw’s depraved world.

The Official SAW Escape was a horror-themed escape room featuring traps and puzzles. Players must overcome these obstacles to advance to the next stage of gameplay. The wow factor of life-size props and gamespaces (several pulled directly from the SAW movies) made up for some of the clunky and frustrating puzzle interactions. 

If horror is your thing and you want to feel like you’ve walked onto a movie set, this is one you won’t want to miss. 

In-game: A person crawling through a crawlspace.
Image via Official SAW Escape

Who is this for?

  • Fans of the SAW Franchise
  • Horror game aficionados
  • Players who want to feel like they’re in a movie
  • Adventure seekers
  • Scenery snobs
  • Players with some experience
  • Players who don’t need to be a part of every puzzle or interaction
  • Players who aren’t disturbed by horror-themed effects
  • Players who don’t mind actors in the game space

Why play?

  • Impressive set design
  • Large-scale interactions
  • Life-size props and traps that you can interact with (many directly from the SAW movies)
  • The excitement
  • The tension

Story

We thought we were taking an exclusive, after-hours tour of the historic Egan & Co. meat packing plant, only to discover that we were actually pawns in one of Jigsaw’s elaborate games. We had to work together to navigate an abandoned factory full of traps before the clock ran out and we faced our demise.

In-game: The front gates of the experience. a brick wall with an imposing black metal gate.
Image via Official SAW Escape

Setting

The gamespace closely mirrored several spaces Jigsaw and his successors used in the Saw movies to conduct their mischief and mayhem. It was large, ominous, detailed and impressive.

The gamespace toned down the horror of the films by not employing restraints or locked doors/ spaces at any point in gameplay.

In-game: Two people looking into a caged area and some strange artifacts.
Image via Official SAW Escape

Gameplay

The Official SAW Escape was a highly immersive escape room with a moderate level of difficulty, exacerbated by the distractions of standard horror-themed special effects.

Core gameplay revolved around searching, observing details, making connections and interacting with large props. It was built in a railroad style. Teams moved through the rooms at timed intervals, whether or not they had solved all the puzzles. For fans of the Saw franchise, the flow will likely bring to mind one movie in particular.

In-game: A person in a cage bathed in green light grasping one of the bars.
Image via Official SAW Escape

Analysis

➕ The Official SAW Experience offered an interesting backstory and compelling first sequence of gameplay. These elements set a tone of confusion, frustration and eeriness that laid the foundation for the remainder of the experience.

➖ The puzzling was frustrating at times. It was sometimes challenging to find the thread of gameplay when entering a new room. On a couple of occasions, The Official SAW Escape could have benefited from stronger cluing instead of relying heavily on our team searching.

➕ The transition from the first stage of gameplay to the second stage was startling and well executed. I rarely use the word giddy, but the sequence made me giddy, and it was one of those moments I wish I could play again for the first time.

➖ There were moments where the gameplay seemed unfair. Some puzzles relied on remembering information from previous rooms, yet that information was no longer accessible after leaving those rooms. (The website did warn this was the case.)

➕ The gamespace was large, detailed and highly immersive. It felt like wandering onto one of the Saw movie sets. Many of the traps, props and gamespaces were the same as or similar to ones used in the movies, adding to the immersion.

➖ The gamespace expanded and contracted significantly at points, which created inconsistency in the number of players needed to be successful. Some rooms required a larger group; other rooms bottlenecked.

➕/➖ The experience can be solidly classified as horror; however, it didn’t capture the outright terror of the movies. Depending on personal preference, this may be a positive or a negative.

➖ While the game started strongly, it lost momentum in the middle. The ending managed to inject some of the fear back and created a sense of urgency, but didn’t match the thrill of the opening.

Tips For Visiting

  • Parking: There is a parking lot. Pay close attention to the street address.
  • ID: Valid identification is required to enter the room escape.
  • Age: The experience isn’t recommended for anyone under the age of 16, and parental supervision may be required. Check before you book if you have minors in your party.
  • Food: The Official SAW Escape is in a highly industrial area; Uber is your best bet for getting to the closest restaurants.
  • Nearby Major Casinos: Circus Circus is a three-minute drive, Stratosphere is a four-minute drive, and Sahara is a five-minute drive.

Book your hour with The Official SAW Escape, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Mystic Escape Room – The Amulet of Time [Review]

Tick Tock

Location:  Littleton, CO

Date Played: September 7, 2019

Team size: 2-6; we recommend 2-4

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: from $74 per team of 2 to $174 per team of 6

Ticketing: Private

Emergency Exit Rating: [A+] No Lock

Physical Restraints: [A+] No Physical Restraints

REA Reaction

The Amulet of Time was a traditional escape room in a small, yet endearing setting.

Mystic Escape Room built a strong, newbie-friendly game. It won’t blow the minds of experienced players, but I think it’s a great place to have one of your first games. Plus, it’s in an adorable town. If you’re in Littleton, Colorado check it out.

Mystic Escape Room Logo

Who is this for?

  • Puzzle lovers
  • Indiana Jones fans
  • Any experience level

Why play?

  • Adorable set design
  • Strong puzzles
  • A good reveal or two

Story

In ancient times, two mystical items were created: the Amulet of Light and the Amulet of Time. Their power was so great that wars were fought over them. The Amulet of Light was destroyed in one such conflict. In response, the secret society dedicated to protecting the Amulet of Time decided to hide the item away within the castle of the Order’s eldest member, Sir Rousseau.

Rousseau built a series of puzzles to conceal the artifact so that only the truly worthy could ever rediscover it.

Setting

The Amulet of Time was cute and cozy. Mystic Escape Room converted a house into their escape room facility. They repurposed all the living space into escape rooms, including a few fun reveals. It was a small gamespace with enjoyable decor, which worked for the staging.

Gameplay

Mystic Escape Room’s The Amulet of Time was a standard escape room with a moderate level of difficulty.

Core gameplay revolved around searching and puzzling.

Analysis

➕ The puzzles flowed well. Although the game was mainly linear, we could work ahead a bit to set ourselves up for the endgame.

The Amulet of Time had a smooth on-boarding.

➕ The Amulet of Time had a compact set that wasn’t fancy, but had personality. It worked for the game.

➖ The gamespace was full of clocks, which fit the theme, but there was no game clock. We don’t generally care about the presence or absence of a game clock, and appreciate when it’s removed for immersive design. In this case, however, the experience was justified by solving puzzles against time, so the decision to remove it seemed inconsistent.

➖ We found some of the clock-related decor to be just a bit too red-herringy. We expect this will cause some players to waste quite a bit of time.

➕ We enjoyed the puzzles. We encountered a variety of puzzle types, some more straight forward and others more complex. The gameplay combined searching, observing, communicating, and puzzling.

➖ This was a generally good, low tech-game. That said, we couldn’t shake the feeling that one or two reveals were screaming for some magic.

Tips For Visiting

  • We found street parking nearby.
  • There are lots of cute restaurants and shops in this neighborhood.

Book your hour with Mystic Escape Room’s The Amulet of Time, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Disclosure: Mystic Escape Room comped our tickets for this game.

Disclosure: Our trip to Denver was sponsored by the Denver escape room community. Contributions were anonymous.