REA & the Case of the Impossible Room

We spent a few days staying in an Airbnb with the strangest “feature.” More on that in a moment, but first, a bit of background.

We’re on our way home from an escape room trip to Athens, Greece.

This was a phenomenal, inventive, and unique escape room city… so you can look forward to lots of Greece content over the coming months.

When we arrived at the Airbnb, a couple of our travel companions immediately told us that we had to see “The Mystery Door.”

This was a door embedded into the wall, approximately 8 feet off of the ground.

A mysterious door high up on a wall. It's cracked open with light passing through the crack.

We immediately began speculating about what was beyond the door… and documenting it on Instagram.

When the rest of our travel companions arrived, we came to a consensus: we would lift Lisa up through this mysterious passageway.

Then she filmed the strange space… which was a bit of a letdown.

Then I had a thought. We cannot possibly have been the first people to venture into that bizarre room… and have found disappointment. So I made a little gift and tossed it through the door for some eventual traveler to find.

Maybe they’ll find it funny. Perhaps they will be frightened. Maybe they’ll solve the simple puzzle that I embedded within the letters. We will never know.

I hope that you enjoyed the madness.

You can follow us on Instagram for stuff that we don’t typically post on Room Escape Artist. We don’t go nuts over-posting.

2 thoughts on “REA & the Case of the Impossible Room

  1. Other than the Devious David aspect for future inquisitors, what I want to know more of is your theory on what/why/how this room came to exist. There must be a window or light source…why? It is a lockable door….why? Is this the Greek way of having additional storage? Assuming the photo was “most of the room” it appears there may be very little room to open and close the door.

    1. Based on the size of the apartment and the architecture, and it’s placement sort of above the top floor, I suspect that it functioned as a servants quarters. You’d need a ladder to properly access it.

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