Lockbox Mysteries – Sherlock Holmes and the Great Charade [Review]

“When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.” -Sherlock Holmes

Location: at home (in our case, a hotel) in Salt Lake City, UT

Date Played: January 5, 2018

Team size: 1-8; we recommend 2-4

Duration: 60-90 minutes

Price: $45 per crate for a 24-hour rental; plus a $50.00 fully refundable deposit (per crate)

REA Reaction

Lockbox Mysteries crammed a ton of gameplay into a crate and briefcase. We’re always a little cautious when approaching a new game format, and Sherlock Holmes and the Great Charade made us believers. While we wished that the props felt just a little more of the era, Lockbox Mysteries delivered excellent puzzle content. We loved playing this game from the comfort of our own home hotel room and the price could not be beat.

Who is this for?

  • Story seekers
  • Puzzle lovers
  • Families
  • Any experience level

Why play?

  • You can play from the comfort of your own home
  • It’s affordable
  • A lot of puzzling content
  • A smart final puzzle sequence


It was 1910 and Scotland Yard was stumped. With a dead woman and no leads, they hired the greatest detective in history, Sherlock Holmes, to crack the case. Wearing the hat of Mr. Holmes, we explored evidence and interrogated the behavior of a number of suspects, puzzling and deducing our way to a conclusion.

A locked brief case sitting on a large plastic crate in a hotel room.


We drove out to a Salt Lake City suburb and retrieved a large box and a briefcase and brought them back to our hotel room.

The plastic crate open revealing an assortment of lock boxes, an envelope labeled "confidential" and a binder that says, "Read First."

When we opened the box we were greeted by a binder that explained the game in careful detail. This included everything from what an escape game is, to the hint system, to basic lock functionality.

Inside of the binder, a hint booklet, timer, and an envelope of extra parts.

We started the included timer and investigated the initially available evidence. From there on it was all puzzles and locks.


Our Lockbox Mysteries experience essentially played like a low-tech escape room without the set. There were lots of locks sealing all sorts of boxes and bags shut. There were even more puzzles.

A pile of locked boxes, and a locked purse.
There was plenty more where this came from.

We needed to deduce the particulars of the murder case before us and rule out suspects. Each suspect had their own branch of puzzles that provided a piece of the overall picture.

Photos and names of 7 suspects and the victim.

All of this culminated in a final deduction puzzle that emphatically punctuated the game with a challenging, creative, and elegant conclusion.


Sherlock Holmes and the Great Charade played like an escape room. It was less immersive than (most) on-site escape rooms, but more physically interactive than (most) at-home escape rooms that come in the mail. It straddled these subgenres. More importantly, it played well.

Lockbox Mysteries surprised us. With each open, we uncovered substantial game pieces… and more puzzles.

Play money fanned out, a passport, and makeup.

Sherlock Holmes and the Great Charade had a lot of puzzle content and the puzzles flowed well. They also broke into parallel plot threads. There was a lot of game and it branched such that it could keep a large group entertained.

The hint system worked. It didn’t give away too much, unless we wanted to get to the solution. Then we could see the solution.

We understood the characters, story, and mystery without working at it. We took it in by way of solving the puzzles. Consequently, the puzzles felt purposeful and the sleuthing felt natural.

The mystery wanted to be solved. It didn’t resolve to some crazy unforeseeable twist. We could play along like detectives, making hypotheses and working towards a conclusion.

Everything was self-contained. We didn’t need an internet-connected device to facilitate the game.


Sherlock Holmes and the Great Charade leaned heavily on decipherments. A few of these overstayed their welcome. Long after the aha moment, we were still deciphering the information.

While we appreciated the many tangible locks in this play-at-home escape room, we would have liked more varied digit structure. At times we’d derive a code that could have unlocked any one of a number of locked items.

Sherlock Holmes and the Great Charade was aesthetically uneven. Some props felt of the era, while others felt far too modern or geographically incorrect.

Tips for Playing

  • You do not need a computer, phone, internet connection, or any outside tools for this play-at-home escape room.
  • You will need to pick up the game near Salt Lake City, and return it the next day. Mass transit will not be an option for the travel.
  • If you can, cook up a meal and really make an evening of the game.

Book your rental with Lockbox Mysteries’ Sherlock Holmes and the Great Charade, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Disclosure: Lockbox Mysteries provided a media discounted rate for this game.


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