Maze Rooms – Magic Kingdom [Review]

Practice good wand form.

Location: Los Angeles, CA

Date Played: August 25, 2018

Team size: 2-6; we recommend 3-5

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: from $99 per ticket for teams of 2 to $198 per ticket for teams of 6

Ticketing: Private

REA Reaction

Magic Kingdom was a magical escape room. Set design, props, locking mechanisms, and many of the puzzle concepts all worked magically, and came together to create a really fun world to play in. Because of the magical world, the lack of clue structure was especially pronounced, forcing us to rely in part on our knowledge of escape room game mechanics to solve Magic Kingdom.

If you’re in Los Angeles and you enjoy solving how a room works, try your wand at the fun and playful world of Magic Kingdom.

In-game: a well in an enchanted forest.

Who is this for?

  • Adventure seekers
  • Scenery snobs
  • Magician wannabes
  • Families
  • Best for players with least some experience

Why play?

  • To perform magic with wands
  • The opening scene

Story

In the Magic Kingdom, the magic tree was dying. We needed to cast a spell in the magic well to bring magic back to the Magic Kingdom.

In-game: the roof a well beneath a large tree and the night sky.

Setting

In their Magic Kingdom, Maze Rooms set the magic tree and magic well under a starry night sky in beautiful, glowing light. Beyond the garden sat a quaint windmill with a few rooms of magical props.

In-game: closeup of a mouse in a tiny house.

Gameplay

Maze Rooms’ Magic Kingdom was a standard escape room with a moderate level of difficulty.

Core gameplay revolved around searching, observing, and making connections.

In-game: a stairwell and a series of locked boxes.

Analysis

+ In Magic Kingdom, Maze Rooms locked all props magically. Given the magical premise of the gamespace, the absence of combination locks worked really well.

+ Some of the scenery, set pieces, and props were beautiful and captivating.

– Some of the clue structure was really worn, almost to point of incomprehensibility. Other cluing had been fixed shoddily, defacing an otherwise beautiful set piece.

+ The magic wands were phenomenal. They were beautiful, tangible props. We had to puzzle out how to work them. Their interactions charged us up.

In-game: a view of the exterior of a home adjacent to a windmill.

+/- Maze Rooms built puzzles into magical concepts. We found one such concept brilliant after we had solved it, but at the time we attempted it, the clues were weak.

– Some of Magic Kingdom’s puzzles needed additional feedback. We couldn’t always tell what we were triggering or whether something had been solved. This was especially pronounced because the world was magical so anything could trigger… well, anything.

In-game: a strange device in a stone walled room.

+/- Maze Rooms added a surprising moment of physical activity (optional for all but one player) and justified it in the gamespace. It was a fun concept. In order to make sure it would be safe, however, the gamemaster had to intervene with instructions. If Maze Rooms could build in-game cluing that facilitates a safe interaction, it would be a clean sweep.

+ The hint system was adorable and fun.

+ Maze Rooms created a lot of magic through a clever scenery-changing mechanic. It facilitated puzzles and enhanced solves.

+ The final combination of set piece and props delivered a fantastic, magical conclusion for the entire group.

Tips for Visiting

  • Maze Rooms is in a small strip mall with a parking lot.
  • At least one person must be comfortable with physical activity.

Book your hour with Maze Rooms’ Magic Kingdom, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

2 thoughts on “Maze Rooms – Magic Kingdom [Review]

  1. Having played this room two months ago I can share with your readers that this review is spot on. Our group enjoyed the room and liked seeing some effects that are unique. The geometry and puzzle structure of the room was a blessing and a curse. The endorphins we all crave from escape room “A-Ha” moments are unfortunately denied us in this room on several occasions as a puzzle solve results in something happening elsewhere that is not visually observable, auditorially detectable or indicated in a manner that lets you know what happened. That is a bit deflating, especially after it happens a few times. I still recommend this room as it is a welcome break from the standard 2015 blueprint for escape rooms that still exists in too many currently operating establishments.

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