Lost Games – The Asylum: Playtime [Review]

A real blood bath

Location:  Las Vegas, NV

Date Played: December 16, 2021

Team size: 2-8; we recommend 3-5

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: from $45 per player for teams of 2 to $35 per player for teams of more than 7

Ticketing: Private

Accessibility Consideration: You may experience dim lighting, fog, and small space entries.

Emergency Exit Rating: [A+] No Lock

Physical Restraints: [A+] No Physical Restraints

REA Reaction

The Asylum: Playtime, formerly known as The Asylum: Chapter 2, functions as a completely standalone game from The Asylum: The Doctor’s Secret. However the two games are mechanically connected in a really nifty way if you book them back-to-back.

The standout component to The Asylum: Playtime was the hint system… it was brilliant, playful, and allowed the gamemaster and the players to creatively engage with one another. For our team, the best moments of the game were born of these interactions.

Closeup of an old television, radio, and record player.

From a gameplay standpoint, The Asylum: Playtime felt traditional, with some of the components feeling worn or dated.

Overall, The Asylum: Playtime has changed a bit in recent months, and we’re told by Lost Games that they plan to make more adjustments.

The reason to play The Asylum – both games – is for the atmosphere and experience. So, if you’re in Las Vegas and looking for a few escape rooms, playing both of the Asylum games back-to-back is a good way to do it.

Who is this for?

  • Adventure seekers
  • Puzzle lovers
  • Horror
  • Best for players with at least some experience
  • Players who don’t need to be a part of every puzzle

Why play?

  • Strong actor-driven moments
  • A wonderful hint system
  • Traditional escape room puzzle play

Story

Following the events of The Doctor’s Secret, we’d saved ourselves from one problem… and found another. With the threat of an impending lobotomy, we had to free ourselves from the asylum’s rec room.

A dim room with a piano and a large box in the corner.
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Lost Games – The Asylum: The Doctor’s Secret [Review]

Take your pills

Location:  Las Vegas, NV

Date Played: December 16, 2021

Team size: 2-8; we recommend 3-5

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: from $45 per player for teams of 2 to $35 per player for teams of more than 7

Ticketing: Private

Accessibility Consideration: You may experience very light crawling, fog, flashing lights and dim lighting.

Emergency Exit Rating: [A+] No Lock

Physical Restraints: [A+] No Physical Restraints

REA Reaction

The Asylum: The Doctor’s Secret, formerly known as The Asylum: Chapter 1 was a traditional, puzzle-focused escape room with a theatrical twist. The performative gamemasters blended with a strong intro sequence to set the stage for an interesting game world.

The world of The Asylum was home to two escape games that could be booked back-to-back, and played as one larger experience. This is absolutely the best way to play them both.

A fireplace with candlesticks.

Aside from the worldbuilding and theatricality, The Asylum: The Doctor’s Secret was a very traditional, puzzle-focused escape game. Which was fine… but it felt like there was a lot of opportunity to do more with the characters and story.

Additionally, the story didn’t really work for us. It felt like there were a lot of hard-to-accept plot holes, and the game’s general handling of mental health felt askew.

Overall, The Asylum: The Doctor’s Secret is a solid escape game with a fantastic intro, and the way that it ties into its sequel felt smart and smooth. If you’re playing one, you should play both, and book them back-to-back.

Who is this for?

  • Adventure seekers
  • Puzzle lovers
  • Horror fans
  • Any experience level
  • Players who don’t need to be a part of every puzzle

Why play?

  • Great actor-driven intro, outro, and hinting
  • Traditional escape room puzzle play

Story

Solitude Heights Asylum for the criminally insane had a dubious reputation. Whispers abounded of mysterious deaths and unexplained phenomena.

With feelings of desperation creeping into our minds, we checked ourselves into the dubious institute… where we quickly learned that the rumors about this place were true.

A red walled doctor's study.
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Lost Games – The Fortune Teller [Review]

The Fortune Teller is one of the best escape rooms in Las Vegas. Here are our recommendations for other great escape rooms in Las Vegas.

Luck of the draw

Location:  Las Vegas, Nevada

Date Played: November 28, 2021

Team Size: 2-8; we recommend 3-5

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: $45 per player for 2 players to $39 per player for 6 players

Ticketing: Private

Game Breakage: One puzzle was out of commission at the time of playing

Accessibility Consideration: All players must climb a flight of stairs to reach the room

Emergency Exit Rating: [A+] No Lock

Physical Restraints: [A+] No Physical Restraints

REA Reaction

The Fortune Teller was an ambitious escape room + immersive theater hybrid, jam-packed with innovative gameplay and actor interactions.

We were enthralled by the novelty and cleverness of many individual elements in The Fortune Teller, yet the implementation of certain puzzles lacked the extra bit of polish that would have made the overall experience truly coalesce. While little was broken outright, multiple instances of glitchy tech and overly finicky puzzles compounded throughout our experience.

But we were not on our own! An in-room actor playing the fortune teller’s assistant fully committed to an enjoyably campy performance. The actor not only communicated key plot points but also allowed for a plethora of puzzle answer formats, more varied than what is possible in most escape rooms. While we enjoyed engaging with the actor’s energetic and funny character, there was room for additional polish — especially with regard to the actor’s timing — given the complexity of the role.

The Fortune Teller was far from a traditional escape room, both in puzzle style and gameplay structure. If you don’t enjoy actor interactions or are turned off by mystical tarot imagery, this probably isn’t the game for you. But if, like us, you appreciate escape rooms that take risks, and have some tolerance for a bit of jankiness, you too may be enchanted by what The Fortune Teller has to offer.

An illuminated bell in a fortune teller's parlor.
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