Handling Counting Puzzles [Room Design & Player Tip]

It turns out that I’ve been counting wrong my whole life… and the odds are good that you have been too.

On a few occasions I’ve encountered escape rooms that include high counting “puzzles.” I am referring to challenges that required our team to count a large volume of items and input those numbers into a combination lock.

While I’ve encountered poorly-clued, high-volume counting puzzles in some of my worst escape room experiences, counting as a challenge isn’t all that uncommon. Here’s how to better handle counting challenges as both a player and a designer.

The Count from Sesame Street kneeling and holding up 4 fingers.

Counting puzzles done well

Counting as a reasonable escape room puzzle usually looks something like this:

You’re in a music studio room and there are instruments all over the place. Most are obvious; a few are well hidden. There are 5 guitars, a keyboard, 2 basses, and 9 drums. Somewhere else in the room you find production notes that say, “when putting together the mix, I started with the bass, then added in the drums, the guitars, and finished with the keyboard.” Your combination is 2-9-5-1.

Counting isn’t fun

Every experienced escape room player eventually finds puzzle types that they simply cannot stand. For example, black lights catch a lot of flack. (I don’t think they deserve all of it.) Counting disappoints me every time I encounter it, even when it’s done well.

It’s a lazy puzzle. It’s patronizing to ask anyone older than 10 to mindlessly count, especially when they are paying for the privilege.

How to count better

While I may not like counting, I will do it when the game demands it. So I was pretty happy to learn that TED-Ed put out a video showing a number of better ways to count large numbers… with your fingers.

I wish I had known this when I was a kid because whenever I had to count anything my brother would love to shout a string of random numbers to throw me off.

Image via Wikipedia.

Video via Lifehacker.

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