New Orleans, Lousiana: Escape Room Recommendations

We were spoiled in Louisiana. The escapes rooms in this region are a cut above.

In 2017, we gave 3 Golden Lock-In Awards to games on this list… and it was tough to choose among them.

That’s why we’re bringing our escape room tour, Escape Immerse Explore, to New Orleans in 2018. Join us this June for a weekend trip to visit many of the escape rooms on this list.

If you’re interested in escape room tourism, this is the region to visit. You won’t regret it.

A close up of a baby gator.

Market standouts

In New Orleans

Outside of New Orleans

The spooky & scary

You are always welcome to contact us if this recommendation list doesn’t answer your specific questions.

13th Gate Escape – Death Row [Review]

Ride the lightning.

Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Date played: October 6, 2017

Team size: 4-8; we recommend 4-5

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: $28 per ticket

Story & setting

We were scheduled for a seat in the electric chair in one hour. Due to overcrowding in the prison, the warden moved us to the old and previously abandoned Cell Block E. Some say that it was shutdown for safety reasons; others because there was an unexplainable escape. We were hoping for the latter because we had to find a way to break out.

In-game: An incredibly realistic of an old, rundown prison cellblock hallway.
Image via 13th Gate Escape.

Death Row nailed the concrete and steel prison aesthetic in another of 13th Gate’s hyper detailed sets. Death Row looked like someone had turned the set of The Green Mile into an escape room. It felt real.

Puzzles

Death Row combined keen observation with mechanical interactions. We needed to parse out which components of our unadorned gamespace would enable us to work the various machinery we encountered.

Death Row included one difficult strength and dexterity challenge… and it was luck of the draw who’d needed to execute on it.

Standouts

We’ve seen a lot of prisons, but 13th’s Gate’s Death Row overshadowed the others. Its high ceilings and deliberately barren walls rendered the cells dramatically unwelcoming. In its depths, we found heavy metal bars and pipes, which completed the aesthetic.

We used the few tools we had to craft an escape with the objects we found. This felt thematically appropriate. One late-game use of a standard item really drew us in.

The final action was fantastic. 13th Gate combined lighting, sound, and other effects to deliver a dramatic and exciting prison ending, unlike any other we’ve played to date. It was a little unsettling, as it should have been.

Shortcomings

Death Row started with each of us in a different cell. There was only so much we could accomplish before freeing ourselves from the cells. Unfortunately, due to the physical layout of the space, the gameplay came to a halt as we all waited for the player with the appropriate vantage point to complete a challenging action. Our inability to help each other, or do much of anything, was frustrating.

Death Row leaned a bit too heavily on journal reading. The gamespace was exciting and engaging and we would have liked to uncover more from the space itself and less from the written word. The most engaging puzzles were those that were fully integrated into the set.

In one instance the cluing in Death Row led us astray, down a frustrating and time consuming path.

All of 13th Gate Escape’s rooms use Escape Room Boss for automated hints. If you’re curious about the details, feel free to read this post on the subject. Beyond that I’ll say that 13th Gate’s gamemasters were fantastic and I wish that they had more direct control over the experience.

Should I play 13th Gate Escape’s Death Row?

Death Row looked and felt like a prison. Creating hyper-realistic environments in large scale is 13th Gate Escape’s bread and butter. They make it look easy… like they hadn’t so much built the set as found it.

I’ve said many times that prison escape games are not my favorite because they generally look and play the same. Death Row was very much a prison escape game, with a lot of the tropes that come with it, but it also had a look that was undeniably cool, and an ending that was anything but common.

The puzzling in Death Row was a little bumpy, but it all came together.

Regardless of your level of escape room experience, Death Row is playable. Some parts pack a lot of challenge. Just approach it calmly, observe what’s at your disposal, and an answer will present itself.

If you’re into the prison escape game concept, you won’t find many that can rival the stunning visuals and feeling of Death Row.

Book your hour with 13th Gate Escape’s Death Row, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Full disclosure: 13th Gate Escape comped our tickets for this game.

RISE Escape Rooms – The Bookie [Review]

Do you want to play a game? No… Seriously, we have casino games.

Location: Tickfaw, LA

Date played: October 6, 2017

Team size: 6-8; we recommend 4-6

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: $28 per ticket

Story & setting

A troublemaking friend talked us into visiting an underground casino. After a night of losing, we finally struck it big, but the bookie overseeing the joint stole our money and sent us packing. The following day we returned with only one thing on our mind: stealing every penny that thieving bookie had to his name.

In-game: A roulette table in the foreground, a card table in the background.

While I can’t say that I’ve visited one, The Bookie looked the part of a small underground casino, complete with a bar and all of the major gaming tables, each one converted into a puzzling station.

Puzzles

The Bookie was built for puzzlers.

The Bookie included both obvious and subtle puzzles. Some puzzles beckoned to us in the form of large casino games. We found others hidden within our surroundings. The Bookie included both sustained, overt puzzling and one-off, observational solves.

While many of the puzzles were themed on casino games, no prior knowledge was necessary to resolve these puzzles. You can solve these puzzles even if you don’t know poker from blackjack.

In-game: shot from within a craps table, the casino's bar lit in the background.

Standouts

RISE Escape Rooms wrapped the casino set in a larger story, which added a layer of excitement and unexpected set exploration.

The Bookie included strong beginning and ending puzzle sequences, with substantial puzzles to chew on in the middle. In this way, the escape room flowed well and created emotional tension.

We interacted with the casino set and props through the puzzles. These tangible, involved puzzles would entertain a larger team without feeling like busywork.

Shortcomings

The Bookie could easily be overwhelming. Casino games themselves are puzzle-y. Escape room puzzles staged on top of blackjack or roulette can be paralyzing, as players need to ascertain how much to involve the games in the puzzles at hand. When some of the puzzling is more complex, as it was in The Bookie, it can be easy for a team to go off the rails. The key to remember going in: the puzzles were not built within the games that they look like. Anyone can solve any of these puzzles.

The Bookie included one arbitrary connection mixed in with these more involved puzzles. It seemed out of place in the experience.

It was possible to solve a little too much of the final puzzle sequence out of phase. This caused us a little bit of confusion.

Should I play RISE Escape Rooms’ The Bookie?

The Bookie was a puzzler’s escape room, set in a gorgeous casino and staged as a heist. It included a number of serious puzzles and this set up added a layer of complexity.

Because of this, The Bookie would be an intimidating challenge for newer players. We recommend that you play a few other escape rooms before taking on The Bookie.

Note that you do not need to know casino games to enjoy The Bookie. You can solve every one of these puzzles even if you’ve never handled dice, cards, or poker chips.

In The Bookie, RISE Escape Rooms wrapped challenging puzzles in a clandestine adventure, which upped our adrenaline level and delivered a seriously fun escape room.

Book your hour with RISE Escape Rooms’ The Bookie, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Full disclosure: RISE Escape Rooms comped our tickets for this game.

Clue Carré – The Voodoo Room [Review]

No players were cursed in making this review.

Location: New Orleans, LA

Date played: October 8, 2017

Team size: up to 10; we recommend 3-5

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: $28 per ticket

Story & setting

Voodoo Queen Marie Laveau left a trail of puzzles to her last bottle of love potion. Could we retrieve it before the curse she left upon her home took effect?

In-game: A livingroom space with two chairs, a small table with a light, and red walls with many pictures hung from it.

The Voodoo Room was aesthetically cohesive and minimally designed. It had a clear and coherent art direction with few set pieces, many wall hangings, and a lot of open space (relative to the game’s size).

The escape room began approachably and got a touch more grim in the second act. It was just barely spooky, so no need to worry about horror.

Puzzles

The puzzles in The Voodoo Room required meticulous observation and careful searching. We needed to notice oddities, patterns, and connections between various set decor and props.

Standouts

The puzzles in The Voodoo Room flowed one to the next. We connected elements, opened locks, and uncovered more intriguing props. The gameplay worked well and would be accessible and unintimidating to newer players.

In-game: A feathery tophat resting on a bookcase. A glowing red lamp in the background.

One set piece flipped the tone of the space midway though the escape room. It was detailed and just a bit eerie. It made the set that much more exciting.

The final puzzle sequence in The Voodoo Room was superb. It felt magical, as love potions generally do.

Shortcomings

The Voodoo Room was an older escape room and much of the gameplay reflected an older design style. This included some challenging search elements that eventually became tedious time wasters. It also meant that Clue Carré hadn’t built the strongest of connections between puzzles and locks.

There were far too many locks with identical digit structures. We were regularly inputting codes multiple times “just to be certain.”

There was a lot to read in The Voodoo Room. While we didn’t need to hang on every word, we did need to familiarize ourselves with the text. It would be easy to get too caught up in reading and miss all the fun.

The Voodoo Room struggled with lighting and ambiance. Clue Carré could develop a more magical and pointed lighting strategy to eliminate that dimness of voodoo-meets-puzzling environment. (Considering that Clue Carré will be replacing The Voodoo Room in a few months, we don’t recommend that they invest in this idea for this particular room escape, at this point.)

Should I play Clue Carré ‘s The Voodoo Room?

The Voodoo Room was a solid beginner-friendly experience with a few nuggets of unusual innovation that would appeal to experienced players.

The Voodoo Room was one of Clue Carré’s first escape rooms and it has been operating for about 3 years. If you played this a couple years back and feel like this review is more positive than what you saw, that’s because Clue Carré overhauled The Voodoo Room a while back and it plays a lot better than it once did. We had friends shadowing us who had played the original and they were pleasantly surprised with how far The Voodoo Room has come.

If you’re looking for something approachable and locally themed to get started with escape rooms, The Voodoo Room is a great choice. If you’re looking for something special, give Clue Carré’s French Quarter House of Curiosities a shot. Regardless of your selection, there’s good puzzling to be had.

Book your hour with Clue Carré’s The Voodoo Room, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Full disclosure: Clue Carré comped our tickets for this game.

 

13th Gate Escape – Agent 13 [Review]

Sharks and freaking laser beams.

Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Date played: October 6, 2017

Team size: 4-8; we recommend 5-6

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: $28 per ticket

Story & setting

We entered the recently discovered bunker of a former Nazi inventor who had infiltrated the United States after World War II. The inventor was a known pioneer in rocketry as well as atomic weaponry, but it is also believed that he was an early and secret pioneer in artificial intelligence. A previous agent had been sent to learn the secrets of this bunker, but he had disappeared. It was up to us to see if we could learn the true nature of this facility and learn the fate of the missing agent.

As with the story, Agent 13’s set was eclectic and detailed. Walking a few feet through a doorway could take us to a completely different world from the one that we had occupied mere moments before. The build quality and attention to detail were beyond incredible… which is true of every room offered by 13th Gate Escape.

In-game: A sci-fi science lab with tubes filled with glowing green material, and a large metal and glass chamber with lighting running through it.
Image via 13th Gate Escape.

In the service of furthering the adventure, 13th Gate Escape filled Agent 13 was many massive set pieces and interactions that did not serve a purpose other than to be really freaking cool. Almost any other escape room company wouldn’t have even thought to add this level of detail.

Puzzles

The beating heart of Agent 13 was technology.

Agent 13 required many different skills including observation, correlation, logic, deduction, communication, and even agility. In general, we engaged the expansive and detailed set to work toward solutions, which we entered in the form of buttons, switches, or the like.

The puzzling in Agent 13 was a team effort.

Standouts

Agent 13 had multiple sets, each more exciting than the last. These were detailed and beautiful. 13th Gate Escape designed intricate and incredible set pieces that were… just set pieces to instill drama. These enhanced the look and feel of each gamespace and made Agent 13 into an emotional rollercoaster of an escape room.

While some of the elaborate set pieces were there simply to add drama, others were deeply involved in the puzzling.

The transitions were incredible. They were surprising and included fantastic effects.

One physically intense stretch of game was designed such that we had to work together to advance. Accomplishing this challenge required at least 4 people.

Shortcomings

Agent 13’s narrative was disjointed. It more or less time-hopped and felt like World War II-meets-Portal. While all of the individual interactions looked cool, we never fully bought into this futuristic 70-year-old-bunker-meets-lab.

A few puzzles lacked adequate clue structure. In one instance, we recommend the tech either accept variant solutions, or the clues be more specific.

13th Gate Escape could tweak the tech slightly to make it more reliable. For example, eliminate the use of a live internet connection to feed critical information that could be hosted locally.

Agent 13 bottlenecked in the climactic moments of the escape room. We ended up largely bypassing the intended communication puzzle, as it overstayed its welcome and was bogged down by lengthy documents, some relevant and others red herrings.

All of 13th Gate Escape’s rooms use Escape Room Boss for automated hints. If you’re curious about the details, feel free to read this post on the subject. Beyond that I’ll say that 13th Gate Escape’s gamemasters were fantastic and I wish that they had more direct control over the experience.

Should I play 13th Gate Escape’s Agent 13?

Agent 13 was impressive. The set was enormous and detailed, with each segment so different from the others. The tech and effects were incredible.

As the sets changed, so too did the puzzle types, which was exciting. The variation, however, contributed to a disparity in fun versus frustration. A few of the puzzles didn’t quite tip the scale in the fun direction.

Agent 13 contains challenging puzzles that rely on communication and teamwork. We expect that Agent 13 would be exceedingly difficult for newer players and is probably best enjoyed by more seasoned players.

As you play though Agent 13, you’ll traverse what feels like the past, the present, and even the future. And that is worth seeing.

Book your hour with 13th Gate Escape’s Agent 13, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Full disclosure: 13th Gate Escape comped our tickets for this game.

 

Escape My Room – Jazz Parlor [Review]

“It’s not the puzzles you play, it’s the puzzles you don’t play.”

Location: New Orleans, LA

Date played: October 7, 2017

Team size: 2-8; we recommend 3-4

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: $30 per ticket

Story & setting

The DeLaporte family hired a team of private investigators to aid in solving a murder that occurred within their estate. Could we wade through the evidence and unmask the criminal who committed this malevolent musical murder?

Escape My Room applied their trademark antique-estate-of-curiosities aesthetic to the Jazz Parlor. The set spanned a number of rooms within the sprawling DeLaporte home that houses all of Escape My Room’s experiences. It was decadent, highly detailed, and loaded with eccentricities of a bygone era.

In-game: An organ covered in blood with bloodied sheet music strewn about a ransacked parlor.

Puzzles

The Jazz Parlor’s puzzling focused on carefully searching, building an understanding of the area around us, and manipulating that environment. Escape My Room conveyed narrative through notes, evidence, and interactions scattered throughout the set.

Standouts

Escape My Room’s DeLaporte Mansion had a distinctive and beautiful aesthetic. The cluttered and quirky decor was intriguing, but not chaotic or distracting. Escape My Room struck a delicate balance between busy and calm. Jazz Parlor was a fun space to explore.

Jazz Parlor had one particularly inventive room transition. We took a strange action – that was clued just enough – and it created something so unexpected.

Throughout Jazz Parlor we gathered pieces of a mystery by way of puzzling. By the time we made our escape, we felt like we’d also unraveled the whodunit. We appreciated their interwoven design.

Escape My Room wants players to spend an hour within their escape rooms. Should you finish early enough, a series of bonus puzzles present themselves.

Shortcomings

While we did unravel the mystery through gameplay, the puzzle flow was sometimes clunky. It wasn’t always clear, at any given moment, what puzzles were relevant. This, combined with a linear game flow, meant occasional hangups in puzzling.

While the escape room was mostly well kept up, one puzzle sequence was thwarted by wear.

Should I play Escape My Room’s Jazz Parlor?

As we explored Jazz Parlor, we unraveled a mystery. It unfolded with each subsequent puzzle solve. When we escaped with a win, it felt that much more complete.

Because at the start you begin to uncover both puzzles and context, it can be challenging to get your bearings in Jazz Parlor. Newer players will likely find Jazz Parlor challenging, but not impenetrable. Be patient. Look for oddities. The connections will come.

In Jazz Parlor, we stepped back in time, into the beautiful and quirky style of Escape My Room’s DeLaporte Mansion and into a fun story that felt quintessentially New Orleans.

Book your hour with Escape My Room’s Jazz Parlor, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Full disclosure: Escape My Room comped our tickets for this game.

RISE Escape Rooms – Hijacked [Review]

“Get off my plane.”

Location: Tickfaw, LA

Date played: October 6, 2017

Team size: 4-7; we recommend 2-4

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: $28 per ticket

Story & setting

We boarded RISE Airlines flight 772, sat in our seats, buckled in, watched a riveting safety demonstration, and then drifted off to sleep… until we were startled awake by a hijacking. It fell to us to secure the plane and land it before it ran out of fuel and fell to the earth.

In-game: The cabin of a commercial aircraft with rows of 3 seats beside closed windows.
Take a moment and look at this.

There’s no other way to put this: RISE Escape Rooms built a commercial airliner’s fuselage into their facility. It bore the look, shape, and aesthetics that anyone who has ever flown will immediately recognize. They even went out of their way to build cabin doors that looked strikingly similar to the genuine artifact.

In-game: A rounded cabin door marked EXIT, with an open and close lever latch.
That was not a camera trick; the door was curved.

Puzzles

The puzzles in Hijacked took us through the components of a commercial aircraft. As we opened each new space or prop, we engaged in a thematically appropriate puzzle. The puzzles traversed the aircraft.

Some of the puzzles involved set or prop interaction. Other times, RISE Escape Rooms presented themed paper-style puzzles to us, on board the aircraft.

Standouts

Hijacked looked and felt like an airborne airplane. The cabin included rows of seats, overhead compartments, a drink cart, and a lavatory. The cockpit had a myriad of buttons and dials. The plane even had the thick, heavy outer doors. It was exciting to explore a space that was familiar, but also unusual. The thing that seemed a little out of place… too much legroom (which was great for the game and would be fantastic in real life too).

In-game: A close-up of a coach seat with the seat belt laying atop it unlatched.

Moreover, RISE Escape Rooms created some shocking full-set interactions.

The puzzles took us throughout the plane, revealing each area of the set in turn. This was exciting.

Hijacked started out with one simple on-ramp puzzle to help us get our bearings. This puzzle asked us to think about the airplane staging. It worked beautifully as the catalyst to this airborne adventure.

Shortcomings

While the puzzles were thematically airplane-y, they didn’t tell the story of a hijacking on board. We made seemingly random connections between objects, generally sticking to a theme. The gameplay was escape room-y.

Hijacked included a number of less interactive, paper-style puzzles. Especially considering the exciting aircraft set, any puzzles that didn’t incorporate the space felt out of place and disappointing.

Should I play RISE Escape Rooms’ Hijacked?

Hijacked was an exhilarating escape room. The gorgeous details sold the adventure. It contributed to the overall experience in ways I never would have dreamed up. It was brilliant.

RISE Escape Rooms constructed Hijacked a couple of years ago and its age shows in the occasionally lackluster gameplay. It was a linear playthrough with more paper-style puzzles that only belonged because they were thematically “airplane.” That said, the puzzles flowed well and built to a more exciting conclusion.

RISE Escape Rooms has built something incredibly special. This set delivered an exciting adventure that overpowered any other shortcomings, even age. This is a must-play.

Whether you’re new to escape rooms or overly experienced, Hijacked offers an unusual and fun adventure. RISE Escape Rooms has constructed a truly impressive environment that delivers a dramatic airborne exploit.

Book your hour with RISE Escape Rooms’ Hijacked, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Full disclosure: RISE Escape Rooms comped our tickets for this game.

 

13th Gate Escape – Tomb of Anubis [Review]

Anubis: God of the afterlife and dramatic reveals.

Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Date played: October 6, 2017

Team size: 4-8; we recommend 5-6

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: $28 per ticket

The 2017 Golden Lock-In award, the REA logo turned into an open padlock with a golden ring around it.
2017 Golden Lock-In Award winner

Story & setting

While following a boring guide through the Pyramids of Giza, we decided that it would be more fun to explore on our own… until we triggered a trap and discovered the corpse of another would-be explorer. There was no going back, only through. Could we find our way out of the Tomb of Anubis?

In-game: A narrow corridor in an Egyptian tomb with a circular series of wheels with symbols on the far wall.
Image via 13th Gate Escape.

Tomb of Anubis was huge. The scale of this escape room was dumbfounding, as was the level of detail. I don’t think it’s a stretch to call the set of Tomb of Anubis a work of art. From sand to sandstone, to carvings and statues, no detail was too small to ignore.

Puzzles

To solve the puzzles, we manipulated the gorgeous and expansive set pieces inside Tomb of Anubis.

To understand the puzzles, we pored over a small journal of diagrams and prose that contained the clue-structure. 13th Gate Escape divorced cluing from the environment.

In-game: A series of colored bottles on a ledge within an Egyptian tomb.
Image via 13th Gate Escape.

While there was a lot of adventure, there were some strikingly challenging puzzles in Tomb of Anubis.

Standouts

When Tomb of Anubis revealed its inner depths, we were shocked. We’d never seen a space transform on such a scale. It was the most dramatic and exciting reveal we’d experienced in an escape room to date.

We were Indiana Jones exploring this tomb. The set reacted to us. On multiple occasions, the tomb revealed surprises. It was intense. It was badass.

Tomb of Anubis was a challenging puzzle game. There were a lot of complex puzzles to work through in the space. They involved beautiful props and the set itself.

We enjoyed one transition space that was a physically interactive puzzle, an elegant link to a previous solve, and a dramatic set interaction all rolled up into one. It was incredible to traverse.

Shortcomings

Inside the Tomb of Anubis, we found a journal that functioned as a run book for the puzzles. It lead us through the different tasks inside the tomb, one by one. We focused on this one prop – and struggled against an unclear font and little diagrams – rather than on the much more impressive space around us. We would have loved to have been able to spend this escape room 100% engaged with the amazing gamespace.

Because much of the clue structure was in the journal, the puzzles were less interconnected and the experience less fluid.

Our gamemaster warned us not to place items on a very inviting surface, so as to not compromise gameplay, but this intervention put a damper on a late-game reveal. If 13th Gate Escape made a small adjustment to the set piece, they’d enhance the drama of that one moment by removing the need for gamemaster intervention. It would be worth it.

All of 13th Gate Escape’s rooms use Escape Room Boss for automated hints. If you’re curious about the details, feel free to read this post on the subject. Beyond that I’ll say that 13th Gate’s gamemasters were fantastic and I wish that they had more direct control over the experience.

Should I play 13th Gate Escape’s Tomb of Anubis?

Tomb of Anubis had one of the most impressive escape room sets that we’ve ever seen. It was enormous, detailed, and interactive. When it changed, oh wow, did it change. It was breathtaking.

I only wish that I hadn’t spent so much of my time in Tomb of Anubis with my head in a little journal.

If you like escape rooms that transport you to incredible places you can’t see in real life, look no further than Tomb of Anubis.

Know too that Tomb of Anubis is no slouch of a puzzle game. Bring a larger team. Cooperate. Share the journals and the set piece interaction. You’ll have to puzzle hard to see this one all the way through.

The Egyptians did the afterlife right.

Book your hour with 13th Gate Escape’s Tomb of Anubis, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Full disclosure: 13th Gate Escape comped our tickets for this game.

Clue Carré – French Quarter House of Curiosities [Review]

Dat dollhouse.

Location: New Orleans, LA

Date played: October 8, 2017

Team size: up to 7; we recommend 4-5

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: $28 per ticket

Story & setting

After arriving in the French Quarter, we went to meet our friend Selma, the clerk at the local House of Curiosities shop. We found the door unlocked and our dear friend missing. Could we explore the odd store and solve the mystery of the missing Selma?

In-game: An assortment of globes, scientific diagrams, minerals, and tiny objects in the house of curiosities.

French Quarter House of Curiosities had an intricate set filled with little details and an eclectic assortment of objects, most of which factored into gameplay. Every shelf and display featured something new and different to look at. It was a charming, convincing, and entertaining environment.

Puzzles

French Quarter House of Curiosities included some phenomenal and amusing teamwork puzzles. It also included detail-orientated observational challenges and some good old-fashioned deduction.

The puzzles flowed well.

Standouts

We loved many of the puzzles in French Quarter House of Curiosities. These required teamwork and took place in large spaces, or across spaces, such that they were accessible to multiple players. It worked well.

In-game: the interior of an elaborate dollhouse.

The puzzles in French Quarter House of Curiosities were humorous. On multiple occasions, we found ourselves chuckling as we read clues, spotted Easter eggs, or solved puzzles.

Clue Carré added a lot of detail to the set. This made it all the more intriguing to explore. It was a random but beautiful aesthetic that worked.

So many of the puzzles felt especially satisfying to solve and they flowed well from one to the next.

Shortcomings

The gamespace felt uneven. While parts were meticulously designed, other areas felt much more plain. We would have loved to see the aesthetic permeate every corner and nook of the room escape.

While many of the props and set pieces helped tell a story, at times French Quarter House of Curiosities reverted to more random escape-roomy puzzles, where items connected for the sake of connection and didn’t really make sense in a larger narrative.

Should I play Clue Carré’s French Quarter House of Curiosities?

French Quarter House of Curiosities was fun, locally-themed group entertainment.

With an interesting set and strong puzzle flow, it will be approachable and entertaining for newbies, but not boring or basic for more experienced players.

Clue Carré was one of the earliest escape room companies in the United States. As the industry grows and evolves, they are progressing with it. French Quarter House of Curiosities excels in places where their earlier escape rooms struggled. It’s exciting to see this early entrant continually adapt.

Bring your curiosity to New Orleans’ French Quarter.

Book your hour with Clue Carré’s French Quarter House of Curiosities, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Full disclosure: Clue Carré comped our tickets for this game.

Escape My Room – Inventor’s Attic [Review]

Rube Goldberg’s bayou punk attic.

Location: New Orleans, LA

Date played: October 7, 2017

Team size: 2-7; we recommend 3-5

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: $30 per ticket

The 2017 Golden Lock-In award, the REA logo turned into an open padlock with a golden ring around it.
2017 Golden Lock-In Award winner

Story & setting

With the DeLaporte annual ball scheduled to begin in an hour, and the estate’s electricity malfunctioning, it fell to us to explore the home and determine the cause of the outages. All wires led to eccentric Uncle Remy DeLaporte’s attic, where he claimed to have invented a perpetual motion machine.

In-game: an antique rolltop desk filled with books and trinkets next to a small bed.

Inventor’s Attic was gorgeous and unusual. This room escape took Escape My Room’s eclectic, antique-collection-of-curiosities aesthetic and bumped it up quite a few notches. Uncle Remy’s makeshift inventions were strewn about the space, each one strange and worthy of exploration.

Puzzles

Inventor’s Attic had a lot of nifty gadgets… and of course, these were puzzles. They were interactive and exciting. Inventor’s Attic also required observation and correlation.

Standouts

Escape My Room’s DeLaporte Mansion has an aesthetic like no other. Inventor’s Attic started off with a similar vibrant look similar to Escape My Room’s other escape rooms, but morphed into a more focused look that maintained the feel of the mansion while setting the attic apart. It was beautifully designed.

In-game: A Rube Goldberg machine with slanted shelves with a number of contraptions affixed to it.

We loved the Rube Goldberg-esque theme that ran through Inventor’s Attic. From the first moment of play, we were intrigued by the interconnected oddities.

With Inventor’s Attic, Escape My Room enhanced their spatial reveals. Two moments in particular stood out, where the space changed in surprising and exciting ways.

A lot of the gadgets within the Inventor’s Attic were, to the best of my knowledge, unique among escape rooms. We enjoyed so many of the puzzles that were the meat of this experience. One in particular was almost mesmerizing to work through and a lot of fun.

For one puzzle, Escape My Room included a player-friendly reset switch, something we’ve rarely seen with this type of challenge.

As a matter of philosophy, Escape My Room wants their players to spend as close to a full hour as possible in each escape room. They present bonus puzzles to speedy teams who win with time to spare. The way they introduced this puzzle was so smart.

Shortcomings

Inventor’s Attic didn’t always give us enough feedback when we’d solved puzzles. We sometimes couldn’t figure out what we’d earned. Additional springs or lighting or audio clues would enhance these little reveals.

One of the more involved puzzles didn’t have adequate cluing. We loved the concept, and how it pulled together the inventor’s aesthetic with that of the overall DeLaporte Mansion, but the puzzle within needed work.

The puzzling at the heart of Inventor’s Attic was largely non-linear. While some will absolutely see this as a boon, we were a little disappointed because many of the puzzles couldn’t really support more than 1-2 players at a time. This meant that each of us completely missed at least one of the amazing interactions in this room escape.

Should I play Escape My Room’s Inventor’s Attic?

I can’t think of a more cohesive escape room company than Escape My Room. Their entryway, lobby, series of lobby puzzles, hallways, and each of their escape rooms have all been crafted with the same aesthetic and story in mind. Even their gamemasters present themselves in character at all times. Everything they have to offer is built around the DeLaporte family, their estate, and their odd history.

It’s damn impressive… and Inventor’s Attic is a jewel in this beautifully strange collection.

Inventor’s Attic is a must-play for experienced room escapers. Its uniqueness, beautiful design, surprising reveals, and brilliant interactions all combined to make an unforgettable and challenging yet fair experience.

Beginners will certainly be impressed by what Inventor’s Attic has to offer, but they will likely be a bit bewildered by it. I would highly recommend playing at least one or two other escape rooms before attempting Inventor’s Attic. That will make this escape room more approachable and let you more fully appreciate how joyous Escape My Room’s latest creation is.

Book your hour with Escape My Room’s Inventor’s Attic, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Full disclosure: Escape My Room comped our tickets for this game.