Brainstorm Escape Games – Black & White [Review]

Black and white and gray.

Location: Norcross, GA

Date Played: March 23, 2018

Team size: up to 10; we recommend 3-5

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: $28 per ticket

Ticketing: Public

REA Reaction

Black & White was a neat concept. It didn’t need the extra hype of the storyline, which it didn’t deliver on. There were some good puzzle, but one was nonsensical and essentially broken.

If Brainstorm Escape Games cleaned up the nonsense, and dropped the over-the-top story that didn’t exist beyond the setup, this one could be worth a visit.

In-game: A black & white checker boarded room.

Who is this for?

  • Any experience level

Why play?

  • Some good puzzles
  • The look of the space

Story

We were sucked into an old black and white TV program. If we couldn’t escape before the end of the show, we’d never see color again.

In-game: A chess set with a black bishop and white queen affixed to the board.

Setting

Black & White was a giant checker board. The set and props were boldly painted to conform to this aesthetic. It was a cool aesthetic.

Upon closer inspection, a lot of the props looked like they could benefit from some refinement.

While everything was black and white, nothing else about the set gave us the sense that we were trapped in an old television show.

Gameplay

Brainstorm Escape Games’ Black & White was a standard escape room with a tough onramp that gave way to a generally low-difficulty game.

Core gameplay revolved around observing and puzzling.

Analysis

+ When our teammates heard the setup for this game, everyone wanted to play it. We were running ahead of schedule and we just couldn’t say no.

– The opening puzzle was staggeringly obtuse. It was needlessly difficult to get started, due to lack of in-room cluing and abundant ambiguity. This was the kind of puzzle that teaches new players to just guess at things in escape rooms.

– Much of the gameplay came from laminated sheets of paper rather than the interesting environment. This felt like a missed opportunity.

Black & White put a brilliant twist on a time-tested escape room standard puzzle.

– There was a frustrating search mechanic: a small tool, a large space, and no direction.

+ Black & White came round to a satisfying final solve. It tied back to the opening, albeit abstractly, and worked well.

– The mid-century TV story felt bolted on. While the black and white aesthetic was cool, it didn’t feel like a period television set. That plot had no obvious correlation to the puzzles. The plot could have just as easily not existed, and the escape room might have been better for it. We didn’t need to make sense of that wacky black and white world, we simply puzzled in it.

Tips for Visiting

  • Parking: There is parking out front.

Book your hour with Brainstorm Escape Games’ Black & White, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Disclosure: Brainstorm Escape Games provided media discounted tickets for this game.

Escape the Netherworld – Haunted [Review]

Puzzles, poltergeist, and a sassy gargoyle.

Location: Stone Mountain, GA

Date Played: March 23, 2018

Team size: up to 8; we recommend 4-6

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: $28 per ticket

Ticketing: Public or Private

REA Reaction

Haunted was exciting. The puzzles, set, and in-character avatar gamemaster delivered both intensity and humor. For a company as talented as Escape the Netherworld, it was disappointing to encounter standard purchased puzzles. Haunted was at its best when it was an original creation, which was most of the game.

If you’re anywhere in the Atlanta area, seek out this haunted escape game.

Haunted team post-game photo.

Who is this for?

  • Adventure seekers
  • Story seekers
  • Puzzle lovers
  • Scenery snobs
  • Any experience level

Why play?

  • Beautiful and imposing set
  • In character gamemastering
  • Finale

Story

After our uncle, a genius parapsychologist had passed away, we learned that he had trapped and almost subdued the horrific Night Hag, a beast who had haunted the family for centuries. Now it was up to us to vanquish the creature or suffer her vengeance.

In-game: A gargoyle with intense eyes.
Image via Escape The Netherworld.

Setting

Our uncle’s laboratory had his workspace in the middle, surrounded by various contraptions and large captive creatures in glass chambers. The whole place had a steampunk haunted house vibe. It looked great.

Portions of the game took place in low light.

Gameplay

Escape the Netherworld’s Haunted was a standard escape room with a compelling set and a higher level of difficulty.

Core gameplay revolved around searching and puzzling.

Analysis

+ The steampunkish set was captivating. Escape the Netherworld built some incredibly detailed set pieces. Some of these only delivered ambiance and did so without misleading us. The gamespace was a fully designed environment and visually interesting.

Haunted felt big. From the set and tangible interactions to the reactions of the space, this escape room had scale.

+ Our gamemaster was a character in our adventure. His avatar chatted with us throughout the game. By this, our third game at Escape the Netherworld, the staff knew our team, and knew how to sass us. And at 11pm, in the 10th game of the day, this was exactly what we needed. It was a riot.

– While the story worked well, it was less innovative than Escape the Netherworld’s other two escape rooms, Sasquatch and Nosferatu.

Haunted included a few purchased puzzles that felt out of place in our uncle’s haunted steampunk lab. Some of these purchased puzzles appeared many times in various Atlanta area escape rooms.

+ The puzzles flowed well in Haunted. They were accessible, non-linear, tangible, and fun.

+ The dramatic ending sequence punctuated the victory. It was memorable and engaged the entire team in the win.

Tips for Visiting

  • Parking: There is parking out front.
  • Food: We enjoyed the nearby Metro Cafe Diner.

Book your hour with Escape the Netherworld’s Haunted, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Disclosure: Escape the Netherworld comped our tickets for this game.

Odyssey Escape Game – Titanic [Review]

…   _ _ _   …

Location: Alpharetta, GA

Date Played: March 25, 2018

Team size: up to 10; we recommend 3-5

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: $28 per ticket

Ticketing: Public

REA Reaction

Titanic shared a sweet story through escape room gameplay. While the sets had some interesting features, they felt largely empty. The puzzle design was uneven, with some puzzles more successfully executed than others. It was a good escape room, but it wasn’t as epic as the subject matter demanded.

If you’re in the area, you might want to check this one out.

In-game: The helm of the ship with a large wheel.
Image via Odyssey Escape Game.

Who is this for?

  • Story seekers
  • Any experience level
  • People who will never let go

Why play?

  • A sweet story
  • The final set

Story

We were crew aboard the Titanic when it collided with the iceberg. We had to send a distress signal, retrieve the Captain’s personal effects, escape to a lifeboat with them, and return them to his wife.

Setting

The deck of Titanic was spacious with a bit of nautical equipment. It was also dark, given that it was night at sea.

Throughout Titanic, parts of the set looked fantastic, but the space between those great props often felt overly large and empty.

Gameplay

Odyssey Escape Game’s Titanic was a standard escape room with a moderate level of difficulty.

Core gameplay revolved around observing and puzzling.

Analysis

+ The setup for the game was intriguing and justified the tasks that we were presented with.

– The most interesting props on the deck of Titanic weren’t part of the game. They were only decor, yet they looked intriguing and interactive. As our gamemaster explained, Odyssey Escape Game wanted to preserve these props and asked us not to play with them. It was disappointing because these things were begging to be part of a puzzle.

– The earlier puzzles asked us to follow a series of instructions. We found ourselves with overlapping instruction lists, which became confusing, and led to puzzle flow problems. Additionally, in one instance a solution required us to disregard order where order was explicitly indicated.

+ One thematically relevant puzzle had a nifty user interface that worked better than most escape room implementations of this type of puzzle. It was satisfying and fun to solve.

– The narrative of Titanic was too level. Although the story was sweet and the puzzles worked pretty well, it felt like it was relying on the game clock to provide drama, because the story itself never really escalated.

+ The final set was a fun location.

Tips for Visiting

Book your hour with Odyssey Escape Game’s Titanic, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Disclosure: Odyssey Escape Game provided media discounted tickets for this game.

Amazing Escape – The Cabin [Review]

“I will murder you with stories of my childhood.”

Location: Norcross, GA

Date Played: March 23, 2018

Team size: up to 8; we recommend 2-4

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: from $25 per ticket

Ticketing: Public

REA Reaction

The Cabin was a standard escape room in a dark, creepy setting. The darkness was the most challenging aspect of the game. While the story didn’t quite work, the vibe came through strongly.

If you’re a local and excited to play in the dark, check this one out.

In-game: A typewriter beside an exposed glowing lightbulb in an otherwise dim room.

Who is this for?

  • Best for beginners
  • People who like a little bit of creep factor

Why play?

  • The intro video
  • A fun teamwork sequence

Story

We’d gotten lost in the woods and stumbled upon a cabin. Once trapped inside, we realized the proprietor might not be such a kind soul, and should he return… we’d rather he didn’t.

In-game: Ceramic bottles and a fish in a dim room.

Setting

The Cabin was dark. There were a few pieces of furniture and some props to make it vaguely like a study. Mostly, I remember that it was dark.

Gameplay

Amazing Escape’s The Cabin was a standard escape room with a low level of difficulty.

Core gameplay revolved around searching and making connections.

Analysis

+? Amazing Escape opened The Cabin with a humorous intro video that was remarkably similar to the one at THE BASEMENT in Los Angeles.

– The Cabin required a lot of searching in barely any light. We found plenty of flashlights, but this was more annoying than entertaining.

– The early puzzles emerged by way of some childhood stories. This attempt at narrative didn’t quite work.

+ We might have been lost in the woods, but one fun puzzle series gave us some direction.

– The Cabin ended abruptly. We were surprised when we realized we were finished.

Tips for Visiting

  • Parking: There is parking out front.

Book your hour with Amazing Escape’s The Cabin, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Disclosure: Amazing Escape provided media discounted tickets for this game.

Escape Plan GA – Beach Escape [Review]

Breezy.

Location: Loganville, GA

Date Played: March 23, 2018

Team size: up to 10; we recommend 3-4

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: $25 per adult ticket, $22 per military/police/fire/teacher tickets, $20 per child ticket

Ticketing: Public

REA Reaction

Beach Escape was a standard escape room. It had good puzzles, but didn’t quite flow smoothly. Through the game, the vibe shifted from calm and relaxing to very light horror. We recommend Beach Escape for beginners.

If you’re a local looking to check out an introductory escape room, give this one a try.

In-game: A beach house living room.

Who is this for?

  • Best for beginners
  • Players who like the idea of very light horror

Why play?

  • For a basic escape room experience

Story

We’d booked a vacation rental by the beach. Once we found ourselves locked in, we realized that the property owner probably didn’t intend for us to get out.

In-game: the cover for the book, "The Beach Kill."

Setting

Our vacation rental had a locked door, but a window to the outside. It had basic furniture and white walls adorned with a wall hangings. It felt homey.

Gameplay

Escape Plan GA’s Beach Escape was a standard escape room with a moderate level of difficulty.

Core gameplay revolved around searching and puzzling.

Analysis

+ The initial space felt cute and cozy.

– Escape Plan GA painted a window into the wall of their locked vacation home. Why wouldn’t we escape through the window? It would seem pretty viable if our lives were in danger.

+ As we explored our rental property, we opened up more space with an interesting trick we don’t often see.

– The puzzle progression felt helter-skelter. Our access to various puzzle components and inputs felt out of whack. Puzzle to lock relation wasn’t well clued. This was further exacerbated by the threat of a lockout safe.

– We were too gentle with the gamespace. It wasn’t clear from the initial instructions that we should be manipulating items that most definitely needed prodding.

– As the story escalated, the set and puzzle design became hokey, which didn’t support the narrative or create a sense of urgency.

Tips for Visiting

  • Parking: There is parking out front.

Book your hour with Escape Plan GA’s Beach Escape, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Disclosure: Escape Plan GA provided media discounted tickets for this game.

 

Brainstorm Escape Games – Area 51 [Review]

We come in pieces.

Location: Norcross, GA

Date Played: March 23, 2018

Team size: up to 10; we recommend 2-4

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: $28 per ticket

Ticketing: Public

REA Reaction

Area 51 was a standard escape room. The set wasn’t particularly interesting, but one interaction notwithstanding, the gameplay worked pretty well. Newbies might be in for a surprise.

If you’re a local looking to try out escape rooms, this would be a good place to start.

In-game: a cabinet marked with red danger tape and labeled, "Area 51 Restricted Area."

Who is this for?

  • Sci-fi fans
  • Best for beginners

Why play?

  • A few fun interactions

Story

The government needed more human body parts to create a human-alien hybrid species. We, however, preferred keeping our parts attached to our bodies.

In-game: A close up of the old Westinghouse logo.

Setting

Brainstorm Escape Games created an office-lab hybrid set. It was mostly office with a touch of lab.

Part of the game was supposed to be in low light. We played the whole thing in low light because mistakes were made. (We still set the record.)

Gameplay

Brainstorm Escape Games’ Area 51 was a standard escape room with a moderate level of difficulty.

Core gameplay revolved around observing and making connections.

Analysis

Area 51 included a few nifty prop-based interactions. These were fun solves.

– However, many of these didn’t make a ton of sense in either an office or a lab.

– There were also numerous specific “do not touch” signs, especially in one area of the set. It seemed like a great opportunity to simply build something that could be interacted with… or that we couldn’t reach and harm.

– Once prop lacked consistency. Neither the clue structure nor the construction attempted to mitigate this issue. It was incredibly frustrating to use and unpleasant to work through.

+ One we got our bearings, we enjoyed a more challenging layered puzzle.

Tips for Visiting

  • Parking: There is parking out front.

Book your hour with Brainstorm Escape Games’ Area 51, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Disclosure: Brainstorm Escape Games provided media discounted tickets for this game.

Project Escape – Nautilus [Review]

Keep talking and nobody implodes.

Location: Marietta, GA

Date Played: March 24, 2018

Team size: 4-10; we recommend 4-6

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: $28 per ticket

Ticketing: Public or Private

REA Reaction

Nautilus looked great and played well. It was challenging, and the challenges were interesting. One communication design flaw notwithstanding, it was a ton of fun.

If you’re anywhere nearby, it’s worth a drive to visit to Nautilus.

In-game: A hard helmet diving suit.

Who is this for?

  • Adventure seekers
  • Puzzle lovers
  • Scenery snobs
  • Jules Verne fans
  • Best for players with at least some experience
  • Players who don’t need to be a part of every puzzle

Why play?

  • Interesting puzzles
  • A great set
  • Surprises
  • Cohesion

Story

A sea monster had attacked our submarine. As the vessel began to come apart, we’d been separated from half of our crew. We needed to make repairs to reunite and regain control of The Nautilus or become sea creature food.

In-game: big metal binary switches.

Setting

We began split between two different rooms: the parlor and the engine room. Each room had an eye-catching hardhat diver suit on display.

The parlor looked like a Victorian living room with book shelves, an easy chair, and soft brown hues. It was relaxing. The engine room had a knobs-and-buttons aesthetic. Everything was very Jules Verne.

In-game: A porthole in the side of the ship.

Gameplay

Project Escape’s Nautilus was a standard escape room with a high level of difficulty and a split beginning. Teams were separated into two different rooms at the start of the escape room.

Core gameplay revolved around searching and puzzling with a heavy emphasis on communication.

Analysis

+ The opening sets of Nautilus looked as intriguing as they were different. Presided over by hardhat diver suits, the sets felt appropriately submarine-esque and Jules Verne-ian.

+ The gamespace was a part of the experience. The large and intricate space was fun to explore and manipulate. It continued to surprise us as we progressed through the escape room.

– The opening communication puzzle was needlessly frustrating. It was unclear whether a dedicated communication channel was absent or broken, but we had to shout to each other through a wall. With our teammates in the background in each room, solving other puzzles, the communication challenge was primarily in hearing the other person. This opening sequence was challenging for the wrong reasons, and therefore tedious.

? The communication theme persisted throughout this escape room. There was a lot to observe and connect. Our team of 8 experienced players suffered from too many engaged eyes, ears, and hands at once. However, I expect small teams would easily overlook important details. Your enjoyment of this puzzle style will likely vary significantly based on your team composition.

+ Many of the puzzles were tactile, environmental-driven solves. We had to search, observe, and make connections, as well as solve more complex, layered puzzles. The puzzles varied in degree of challenge and type of challenge. The gameplay flowed well. When we won, we felt like we had earned it.

+ This was a cohesive and well-realized design.

Tips for Visiting

  • Parking: There is parking out front.
  • Note that if you book multiple games at Project Escape, you might have to drive/walk around the building complex between games because they aren’t all located at the same entrance.
  • Food: We enjoyed the Marietta Diner.
  • Accessibility: At least one teammate needs to be able to crawl and maneuver in a small space.

Book your hour with Project Escape’s Nautilus, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Disclosure: Project Escape comped our tickets for this game.

Escape the Netherworld – Nosferatu [Review]

Dracula’s antique lock collection.

Location: Stone Mountain, GA

Date Played: March 23, 2018

Team size: up to 8; we recommend 4 or 6 or maybe 8 (an even number)

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: $28 per ticket

Ticketing: Public or Private

REA Reaction

Nosferatu put an interesting twist on escape rooms by adding individual roles and goals. The set was visually impactful from the opening moments and maintained the intensity through dynamic interactions. The late-game sequence brought the level of excitement we’d expect from an escape room created by a haunted house.

If you find yourself anywhere near Stone Mountain, GA, go visit this crypt.

Nosferatu team post-game photo.

Who is this for?

  • Adventure seekers
  • Story seekers
  • Puzzle lovers
  • Scenery snobs
  • Creatures of the night
  • Amateur locksmiths
  • Best for players with at least some experience

Why play?

  • Beautiful sets (and lock collection!)
  • Exciting moments
  • In-character gamemastering
  • Individual goals

Story

In Victorian London, a mysterious man named Van Helsing had hired each of us for a mysterious mission. We had arrived at his designated address, each with our own secret agenda. We learned that if we were to survive, we had to band together and determine how to slay the legendary vampire Nosferatu before he rose and feasted on us.

In-game: An Egyptian sarcophagus in a Victorian setting.
Image via Escape The Netherworld.

Setting

Nosferatu’s unique set looked almost church-like with an unusual mixture of Gothic and ancient Egyptian influences. It looked fantastic.

Gameplay

Escape the Netherworld’s Nosferatu was a standard escape room with a few twists and a higher level of difficulty.

The main twist: we each had an individual goal. While we all won or lost the escape room together, individual players could complete bonus assignments along the way. Some of these assignments put players into passive conflict with one another. This is why we recommend that you play with an even number of teammates.

The second twist: we had to make a choice.

Analysis

+ The set design was top-notch.

+ There were some brilliant effects that added a lot of drama to the immersion. This was especially true of the closing series of interactions.

+ The individual bonus assignments forced us to strategize and solve outside of the regular gameflow. This kept everyone engaged.

– One of the individual assignments was ambiguous.

+ There were a lot of carefully selected locks in Nosferatu. Some were antique; some simply looked the part. All of them fit the aesthetic of the gamespace.

– If you don’t know your way around locks, the volume of them would get annoying.

+ There was a lot to do in this room escape.

– Because there were so many interactions, only one or two people experienced many of the really cool moments.

– There was also a whole lot of reading.

+ The choice was clear. We were able to anticipate the impact of our decision on the outcome of the game.

Tips for Visiting

  • Parking: There is parking out front.
  • Food: We enjoyed the nearby Metro Cafe Diner.

Book your hour with Escape the Netherworld’s Nosferatu, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Disclosure: Escape the Netherworld comped our tickets for this game.

Odyssey Escape Game – Towering Inferno [Review]

Fire drill.

Location: Alpharetta, GA

Date Played: March 25, 2018

Team size: up to 12; we recommend 3-5

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: $28 per ticket

Ticketing: Public

REA Reaction

Towering Inferno was dramatic. It had stakes. Despite some tedious early puzzles, it built excitement.

If you’re in the area and looking for adventure, go put out this fire.

In-game: The Theron Tower office. It looks very corporate.

Who is this for?

  • Adventure seekers
  • Story seekers
  • Any experience level
  • Players who don’t need to be a part of every puzzle

Why play?

  • The unique staging
  • Setting off the fire alarm
  • Escalation

Story

It was the grand opening of Theron Tower, a new skyscraper. As Chief Engineer, we’d detected electrical hazards throughout the tower, but the Chairman of the Board had refused to push back the opening. With the event in full swing, and fires starting throughout the tower, from our top floor office we needed to enable fire suppression, shutdown electrical junctions, and escape to the roof for a helicopter rescue.

In-game: The tower's rooftop.

Setting

We occupied an office on the top floor of Theron Tower. It had white walls, bright lights, and computer stations in cubicles. Our office had various diagrams of the facility as well.

The set nailed the big corporate office aesthetic far better than most of the office escape rooms we’ve played. As the game pushed forward, we found ourselves working through more unusual sets.

In-game: A cubical with a computer desk.

Gameplay

Odyssey Escape Game’s Towering Inferno was a standard escape room with a moderate level of difficulty.

Core gameplay revolved around searching and puzzling.

Analysis

+ Despite the office decor, we were energized by the unique theme. We’ve played as Firefighters, but never as engineers fighting fires from our computers, working towards a roof-top helicopter rescue.

+ The escape room gave backstory to the impending disaster. It created our character, as well as the others at Theron Tower, with context and motives. The story made sense and our role in it was clear.

+ Our gamemaster clearly stated that we would have to push the fire alarm as part of the game. I can’t overstate how important this pre-game preparation was.

In-game: A fire alarm push button locked behind a clear plastic casing.

– The firefighting puzzles were computer-based, tedious, uninteresting, and inaccessible to most teammates.

– The computer station puzzles were imbalanced. One could be completed much more quickly than the other. Because of this, the flow was disrupted. We spent a lot of time waiting on our teammates.

– The computers presented repetitive-task puzzles. Once we’d determined how to solve them, we had to play along as the computer continued to present versions of the scenario so that we could repeat the same solve logic. Unlike computer games, however, these didn’t reward mastery with a harder version, nor did they offer a “speed up” button as we set each version to solved. 1 person continued to plod away with this, with 1 other giving input, and the rest of the team looking on. These mini-games dragged.

+ Odyssey Escape Game had built a neat graphic to show our progress through the suppression of the fire.

– While we liked the idea for this escape room, the fire extinguishing scenarios didn’t make any sense in light of human and machine capabilities and fire safety. Narratively, it didn’t hold water.

+ The culminating scene was dramatic and exciting. We enjoyed the set juxtaposition: bright and dark, ordinary and unusual. Towering Inferno escalated well.

Tips for Visiting

Book your hour with Odyssey Escape Game’s Towering Inferno, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Disclosure: Odyssey Escape Game provided media discounted tickets for this game.

 

Escape Plan GA – Bank Heist [Review]

Puzzle withdrawal.

Location: Loganville, GA

Date Played: March 23, 2018

Team size: up to 8; we recommend 4-5

Duration: 60 minutes

Price: $25 per adult ticket, $22 per military/police/fire/teacher tickets, $20 per child ticket

Ticketing: Public

REA Reaction

Bank Heist was a challenging search-and-puzzle escape room. Play this one for the puzzles. It was uneven in set design and game flow. Not recommended for newbies.

If you’re nearby and want a challenge, go take it on.

In-game: A lectern that reads, "Next Teller Please."

Who is this for?

  • Puzzle lovers
  • Best for players who want a challenge
  • Best for players with at least some experience

Why play?

  • Some neat moments, especially in the last act
  • A stiff challenge

Story

We were robbing a bank to initiate ourselves into the mob, as one does.

In-game: A bank safe beside a paperwork table.

Setting

The gamespace was fairly tight and crammed a number of different bank-esque set pieces into the room.

Our robbery began in the office-like space in front of the bank vault door. The carpeted room consisted mainly of a large desk, lectern, some wall hangings, and of course, the entrance to the bank vault.

The set design was inconsistent with a few gems, particularly in the late-game, and a lot of stuff that just felt more or less recognizable as belonging in a bank.

In-game: A telephone and calculator on a desk.

Gameplay

Escape Plan GA’s Bank Heist was a standard escape room with a high level of difficulty.

Core gameplay revolved around searching and puzzling.

Analysis

Bank Heist was a difficult search-and-puzzle game, with satisfying finds and solves. It was a challenge, even for our experienced team. We comfortably escaped, but we had to work at it.

– This was a heavily adapted N.E.R.D. escape room. At times, it felt like the clue structure had been edited incompletely, with remnants of previous puzzles remaining in the props. In one case this really tipped the scales a bit too far towards confusion.

– Escape Plan GA didn’t “ask why” quite enough. One of the bigger moments in Bank Heist involved doing one of the few things that I know I would never do if I were attempting a bank robbery… And I don’t know a lot about robbing banks.

+ Escape Plan GA did a fantastic job of selecting some of their locks and staging a number of the later interactions.

– Some of our teammates missed the most visually impactful moments because the most cinematic part of the experience was too closed off for the entire team to view it.

? This was a difficult game (arguably the hardest we encountered in Atlanta). We enjoyed the challenge, your mileage may vary.

Tips for Visiting

  • Parking: There is parking out front.
  • Escape Plan GA has a comfortable lounge area.

Book your hour with Escape Plan GA’s Bank Heist, and tell them that the Room Escape Artist sent you.

Disclosure: Escape Plan GA provided media discounted tickets for this game.